Was Maduna's R320m BEE benefit a payoff for screwing the rand?

Was Maduna's R320m BEE benefit a payoff for screwing the rand?

Battle with his ex unearths a curious patronage gratuity worth a quarter of a billion rand, and much more.

A recent post-divorce scrap in the courts calls for a recap of a story that appeared in Noseweek in July last year (nose189). In that story we recounted how, in July 2006, within two years of his quitting the South African Cabinet as Justice Minister, Penuell Maduna had spearheaded a so-called BBEE deal designed and implemented by Sasol (in recent years listed both on the JSE and in New York).

Sasol said its new BBEE partner, Tshwarisano (Sesotho for “pulling together”) was comprised of “many historically disadvantaged groups around the country”. Its chief “promoters” were named as Penuell Maduna, Hixonia Nyasulu and Reuel Khoza.

To what extent did the three “promoters” benefit from the deal? Nothing was said about that, but the suggestion was they would only be three among thousands.

Zululand Uni execs rush-and-grab

Zululand Uni execs rush-and-grab

As students struggle with fees, Zululand University rushes to buy luxury sea view homes for its top execs. 

As universities across the country face an uncertain future amid student revolts over fees and diminishing grants, the University of Zululand at Ngoye in North KwaZulu-Natal  splashed out on nine luxury homes for its executives in an exclusive riverside estate – some still to be built.

In the end-of-year interlude between last year’s student riots and this year’s renewed riots, the university quietly spent R24 million, in cash, to purchase the properties – some of them still just vacant plots of land.

The university then furnished the houses with top-of-the-range sound systems, plasma-screen televisions, lounge suites and beds. The executives, who pocket between R1.3m for lowly officials, to R2.9m per annum for the vice chancellor, were intimately involved in the planning phase and some were even allowed to add a swimming pool or sauna – or both if they so wished. Noseweek’s sources believe the total cost will be in excess of R35m.

The property purchase was made while the university had failed to pay for its outsourced whistleblower programme – a programme the VC was keen to can – and while outstanding student funding had not been paid over to the university to help needy students.

The homes are in the upmarket Zini River Estate, in Mtunzini on KZN’s north coast, a 20-minute drive from the main university campus.

The untrustworthy trust

The untrustworthy trust

The king may be fake and the land claim dodgy, but who’s to complain when there’s money to be made?

Adispute over a “tribal” land claim in KwaZulu-Natal Midlands could be the key to exposing corruption involving suspect land claims that have benefited a wealthy elite – including land-claims officials – at the expense of the rural poor.

In 2003 a claim was made on 106 farms in the Camperdown area by 315 members of the Azibuye Emasisweni Maqamu Community Trust. Between 2007 and 2010 the state spent R25 million purchasing 12 of the farms to satisfy the claim. In September last year the process to reclaim the remaining farms was put into motion.

But somehow, depending on which faction of the now-fractured trust one speaks to, the land was hijacked by a man referred to as Inkosi Siphiwe Majozi.

Widow wants answers from Bill Rawson

Widow wants answers from Bill Rawson

Real estate tycoon Bill Rawson refuses to explain how a valuable franchise disappeared from the estate of family axe-murderer Tony Adlington.

Nearly 15 years ago in January 2002, Debbie Adlington lay in a coma in the intensive care unit at Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town, having been bludgeoned by her husband.Estate agent, Tony Adlington, 42, attacked his 38-year-old wife in their Marina da Gama home with the blunt end of an axe, leaving her unconscious, before hacking the couple’s three young children to death. He struck Kevin, 12, Katelyn, ten, and Craig, nine, with the sharp edge of the axe, before setting their bodies alight. He then shot himself in the head.

Debbie’s devastated relations rushed from their homes in KwaZulu-Natal, to keep vigil at her bedside, hoping for signs of response.

After the initial shock, and with Debbie still in a coma, her father David MacInnes and her brothers, Nigel and Bruce, decided to start assessing the financial situation that Tony had left behind. A qualified CA, he had been operating a Rawson Property Group franchise, serving the lower Wynberg area. His office was in 2nd Avenue, Kenilworth, and he sold commercial and other properties. At one stage, he had nine agents working under him. The agency also managed bodies corporate, for which it earned fees.

Environment department diverts Sanral bypass plan

Environment department diverts Sanral bypass plan

Harrismith and Platberg Nature Reserve get a reprieve – for now. 

Sanral’s rush to push through a plan to reroute the N3 highway between Johannesburg and Durban across De Beer’s Pass, shaving just 14km off the existing route at – a cost of nearly R10 billion, has met with resistance from an unexpected quarter: the Department of Environmental Affairs.

Until now the bulk of the opposition faced by the SA National Roads Agency Ltd has come from the people of Harrismith, which is an important stop-off point along the route. Sanral’s planned new route will cross the escarpment many kilometres from Harrismith. Cheerleaders for the proposed rerouting implausibly suggest that the town will lose only a handful of jobs as a result of being bypassed. 

However, an economic impact assessment by Mike Schussler of Economists.co.za reckons Harrismith stands to lose annual business worth R890 million and more than 1,600 jobs if the De Beer’s Pass project goes ahead.

Rooibos Rogue keeps up with the Spencers

Rooibos Rogue keeps up with the Spencers

R70m Cape escape for French multi-millionaire.

When a reader pointed out Noseweek’s mistake about the owner of the Constantia mansion once owned by Princess Diana’s brother Earl Spencer, we discovered that it now belongs to the well-connected Frenchman who tried to snaffle South Africa’s trademark rights to rooibos tea in Europe.

Unlike the red bush brand that he clandestinely tried to appropriate, lobbyist, art collector and obvious tea-lover Matthias Leridon had to pay a substantial sum for the Cape Town property which he bought in September last year: it cost him a cool R51.5 million.Then, of course, to avoid having any unruly neighbours, he also had to buy the plot next door, for R19.5m.

Not rocket science: Sweet profits. Bitter truth

Not rocket science: Sweet profits. Bitter truth

There is a fat man holding my girlfriend and waving his knife perilously near her tender throat. I ask that he not chew so loudly, as he is sitting in the row behind us at the cinema. He takes great offence at my request, even though I have sat through almost the entire movie without complaining once. He responds by inching the knife closer to my now-screaming date’s throat, and all eyes on the shocked faces of the audience are now focussed on us.

Let me deconstruct this gruesome scene...

R13m tax debt waived - with just a scribbled note

R13m tax debt waived - with just a scribbled note

 R13m tax bill cancelled – at the stroke of a pen.

The senior tax official fingered in recent news reports for the large number of “suspicious and unusual” cash deposits into his bank accounts, totalling at least R1.2 million, also featured prominently in the suspiciously bungled tax fraud case brought against notorious Durban tenderpreneurs Shauwn and S’bu Mpisane.

Nedbank ducks and dives - but Tiaan stands fast

Nedbank ducks and dives - but Tiaan stands fast

Retired Witsand businessman and disenchanted Nedbank client Tiaan Lamprecht finally has a court date – in March next year – having been systematically and shamelessly lied to by Nedbank for nearly 13 years in their determination to avoid iability for the wrongdoing of a senior employee that resulted in Lamprecht’s losing his R1-million investment.

Lamprecht is by now so outraged by the bank’s deceit that he is prepared to fight the matter “even from the grave”.

His story was first reported in nose160. His approach to Noseweek was largely fuelled by what had happened shortly beforehand. In November 2012 Nedbank had managed to sweet-talk Lamprecht into withdrawing his pending court case against them in favour of private mediation.

Absa response to widow raises more questions than it answers

Absa response to widow raises more questions than it answers

A rural KwaZulu-Natal Midlands widow who has been fighting for access to her late husband’s provident fund for the past three years, was told that if she wants to know where the cash is, she must get a court order.

Noseweek first wrote about the case of Mandisa Happy Dlamini in November 2015 (“Absa accused of being ‘shameless liars’”, nose193). Ever since her husband Bernard died in May 2013, she has been in an endless battle with Absa Consultants and Actuaries (ACA), who manage the Private Security Sector Provident Fund (PSSPF), to pay out her late husband’s death benefit. All in vain. In July 2013 Dlamini, who had been unemployed and pregnant with Bernard’s child at the time of his death, asked her former employer Gail Meyer, an estate agent from Durban, for help.

Home Affairs gets a kick in the Trump

Home Affairs gets a kick in the Trump

Xenophobia is alive and well, living in the Department of Home Affairs in Pretoria and secretly engaged to Donald Trump.

On 6 September 2016 the Supreme Court of Appeal (SCA) was set to hear the case of an eight-year-old stateless child born in South Africa who has steadfastly been denied her right to South African citizenship by Home Affairs officials.

The child, referred to only by her initials, DGLR, in court proceedings, has, since birth, clearly been entitled to South African citizenship in terms of Section 2(2) of the Citizenship Act.

Spring fever. Mad, bad and sad

Spring fever. Mad, bad and sad

Spring has sprung, the wattle and bottlebrush are in bloom and here’s a small nugget of optimism: Victoria is to ban all onshore unconventional gas exploration, including fracking and coal seam gas, after a parliamentary inquiry received more than 1,600 submissions, mostly opposed. The Greens called it a win over powerful and influential mining companies, and an adviser at the Australia Institute, Mark Ogge, said the ban was “sound economic and energy policy”, given that the economic benefits promised by the gas industry in Queensland had failed to materialise. Research found that for every 10 new gas jobs, 18 agricultural jobs were lost.

DEA orders “leachate dump” into Durban sea stopped

The disposal of millions of litres of leachate from a Shongweni toxic waste landfill site by pumping it offshore of a popular fishing beach in Durban has been stopped.

 
Speaking at a community meeting in Merebank on Thursday night, Natasha Pillay of the Department of Environmental Affairs (DEA) Oceans
 

Bank gets its sticky fingers on inventor's keyboard program

Bank gets its sticky fingers on inventor's keyboard program

Did Standard Bank lie and cheat to steal an idea worth billions? When atm and internet fraud started seeping into public consciousness in the 1990s, Joburg-based software development company Advertising Digital Services (ADS) ...
 
Was Maduna's R320m BEE benefit a payoff for screwing the rand?

Was Maduna's R320m BEE benefit a payoff for screwing the rand?

Battle with his ex unearths a curious patronage gratuity worth a quarter of a billion rand, and much more. A recent post-divorce scrap in the courts calls for a recap of a story that appeared ...

Zululand Uni execs rush-and-grab

Zululand Uni execs rush-and-grab

As students struggle with fees, Zululand University rushes to buy luxury sea view homes for its top execs.  As universities across the country face an uncertain future amid student revolts over fees and diminishing ...

The untrustworthy trust

The untrustworthy trust

The king may be fake and the land claim dodgy, but who’s to complain when there’s money to be made? Adispute over a “tribal” land claim in KwaZulu-Natal Midlands could be the key to ...

Widow wants answers from Bill Rawson

Widow wants answers from Bill Rawson

Real estate tycoon Bill Rawson refuses to explain how a valuable franchise disappeared from the estate of family axe-murderer Tony Adlington. Nearly 15 years ago in January 2002, Debbie Adlington lay in a coma ...

Environment department diverts Sanral bypass plan

Environment department diverts Sanral bypass plan

Harrismith and Platberg Nature Reserve get a reprieve – for now.  Sanral’s rush to push through a plan to reroute the N3 highway between Johannesburg and Durban across De Beer’s Pass, shaving just 14km ...

Rooibos Rogue keeps up with the Spencers

Rooibos Rogue keeps up with the Spencers

R70m Cape escape for French multi-millionaire. When a reader pointed out Noseweek’s mistake about the owner of the Constantia mansion once owned by Princess Diana’s brother Earl Spencer, we discovered that it now belongs ...

Not rocket science: Sweet profits. Bitter truth

Not rocket science: Sweet profits. Bitter truth

There is a fat man holding my girlfriend and waving his knife perilously near her tender throat. I ask that he not chew so loudly, as he is sitting in the row behind ...

R13m tax debt waived - with just a scribbled note

R13m tax debt waived - with just a scribbled note

 R13m tax bill cancelled – at the stroke of a pen. The senior tax official fingered in recent news reports for the large number of “suspicious and unusual” cash deposits into his bank ...

Nedbank ducks and dives - but Tiaan stands fast

Nedbank ducks and dives - but Tiaan stands fast

Retired Witsand businessman and disenchanted Nedbank client Tiaan Lamprecht finally has a court date – in March next year – having been systematically and shamelessly lied to by Nedbank for nearly 13 years ...

Absa response to widow raises more questions than it answers

Absa response to widow raises more questions than it answers

A rural KwaZulu-Natal Midlands widow who has been fighting for access to her late husband’s provident fund for the past three years, was told that if she wants to know where the cash ...

Home Affairs gets a kick in the Trump

Home Affairs gets a kick in the Trump

Xenophobia is alive and well, living in the Department of Home Affairs in Pretoria and secretly engaged to Donald Trump. On 6 September 2016 the Supreme Court of Appeal (SCA) was set to hear the ...

Spring fever. Mad, bad and sad

Spring fever. Mad, bad and sad

Spring has sprung, the wattle and bottlebrush are in bloom and here’s a small nugget of optimism: Victoria is to ban all onshore unconventional gas exploration, including fracking and coal seam gas, after ...